Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

By kendallhart808
Image Motto: Felicitatem in Deo est (In God Comes Prosperity)
Post Reply
kendallhart808
Speaker of the Alliance
Speaker of the Alliance
Posts: 962
Joined: August 15th 2015, 1:22 pm
Nation: Carolina & The Cape
Location: NC

Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by kendallhart808 » August 14th 2017, 3:06 am

Project Palmetto
The Birth of a Southern Nation

(This is not the official bid, more of an exploring and commenting session)

It now appears to me, that there is an impending problem with Carolina. After my second bill failed, albeit for numerous reasons, and both Stan and Invadernat have pointed out how crucial Carolina is to the United States, I would like to take a look into something I'm calling Project Carolina. This will be similar to Project Oka, it will be an open forum based discussion where I will present different chapters on my way to achieving the goals of a more reformed Carolina that blends better into the landscape. So I know some of you are like, well didn't he try this earlier. The answer is yet, but in a rushed way. The project took to much land and was rushed to try and change up Carolina. Albeit all of my bills have been somewhat rushed. Hopefully by taking an in depth approach at Carolina, and looking into it's problems we can all agree upon solutions and figure out the best way to a new Carolina.

Carolina is actually supposed to be a separate Southern Nation. It's identity is original supposed to be built on the back of a southern identity, and that's the way Carolina was supposed to be from the start. I would like to get back to that, building a country on the back of a southern identity. That absolutely does not mean building it on the back of a white supremacist ideal, and want to be clear that this is not supposed to be the CSA, or at least the CSA that exists IRL.

Chapter 1: The Breaking Point
I think that it is no secret, that the easiest and truly only way to save American history pre-Civil War would be to have the states that currently make up Carolina, be a part of the United States, and for this to happen and the nation that we know right now as Carolina to still exist, we would need a breaking point. Greg had a good idea of using the American Civil War as the backdrop of this breaking point. However remember earlier how I said that I wanted the country not to be as built on the white nationalist ideology. Well that means that the CSA doesn't quite work in this scenario, as the main reason they were fighting was for slavery. What the civil war would need to be turned into, is a war for Southern Independence. Southern Nationalism would have to be created in the decades before the civil war, with Abraham Lincoln's election being the final straw. It is no secret that the economic way of life in the south before the civil war was through slavery so the southerners might see this as an encroachment upon their nationalism. Greg also had another really good idea of overriding the CSA, writing another country that sort of takes it's place, and then turning the tide of the war. How this could be done, I'm not sure, and it's not really in my interest at the moment, as I want to only focus on the breaking point. So if the breaking point is the civil war, the question is, who joins and who doesn't join? Well you likely see your main southern states going for the country, as they would be the core of this southern nationalism. South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisana would be the main states in my mind. Being choked out, Florida would likely also join the new nation. So the question is now, would Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Texas join. Well that's a very good question, and it's truly hard to say. I would truly believe that most of these states would reluctantly join, with unionist factions breaking out. This would likely play a major role at any sort of peace conference, the middle areas of Tennessee, West Virginia, northern Virginia, and west Texas all had unionist sentiments, and two of those regions' congressman continue to seat until they were eventually ousted. So this will play into my next chapter.

Chapter 2: Borders
While expanding Carolina may be extremely controversial, I think that in any circumstances there would be a lot of give and take. The US, in any circumstances is going to argue for three regions, central Tennessee, Western Texas, and Northern Virginia. Central Tennessee was fairly strategic and had good union sentiments. The Tennessee valley hosts the key to a major river, and again, the US is going to want to advocate for whichever non-southern nationalists it can get. It would also likely argue for Western Texas to gain a port on the Gulf and to continue to have a link to the west, and would also argue for Northern Virginia to protect DC. Saying that all of this is granted to them, the boundaries of Carolina may look a bit like this.

Per Dats idea, the Trinity River would likely be used in Texas as the western border of the country. It splits eastern and central Texas, eastern Texas being where most of the plantation owners were. It also would give the US Houston, and would only split the Dallas metroplex IRL. The border then would be a straight line north from the headwaters of the Trinity north of Dallas to the Red River that runs as the boundary between RL Oklahoma and Texas. The area north of this is very complicated. The five civilized tribes that make up the Indian Territory/Oklahoma were allied with the Confederacy during the civil war. Yet, they would likely not be Southern Nationalists as the Southerners are what moved them into their reserve in Oklahoma from their native lands in North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Therefore this territory would go both ways and is open to debate. Arkansas and Louisiana would likely be a part of the new nation, so would the gulf states (Alabama, Mississippi, Florida). Tennessee is a very tricky state, as it could go both ways. One idea, would be to use the Tennessee River as the northern boundary, which would dip down south before heading back north. Another idea would be to cede the Western Tennessee area over to the US, and/or the Appalachian mountains area as well. However the Tennessee River would likely make the most natural border, and would give the more unionist Central Tennessee to the US while the likely more southern nationalist area of Western Tennessee to the new nation. Then on to Virginia. In Virginia I think the best border is also another River, this one being the James River. It essentially would allow Southern Virginia to remain part of the new nation while the northern section is placed under US jurisdiction.

So the country would turn out to look something kinda like this: Image

Again please place your thoughts down below as this is supposed to be an open discussion. These are my ideas but I would love to see your ideas.
User avatar
Gregor
Posts: 1437
Joined: December 25th 2011, 2:30 pm
Nation: Oka & Malerno
Location: Lausanne
Contact:

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by Gregor » August 14th 2017, 8:25 am

As we talked on skype yesterday, and with Dats the splitting of Texas seems plausible, as for the north border, I like the Tenessee river idea, plus the native tribes map can give some insights, maybe Carolina would have allied with the Natives somehow ?

All in all, I like how the country looks, the borders seem sensible. Keep in mind you can follow natural borders, and then make a strait line, like most states that mix organic and artificial borders :)

http://www.emersonkent.com/images/indian_tribes.jpg
_____________ Image Oka City AIN Cultural Capital 2018
kendallhart808
Speaker of the Alliance
Speaker of the Alliance
Posts: 962
Joined: August 15th 2015, 1:22 pm
Nation: Carolina & The Cape
Location: NC

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by kendallhart808 » August 14th 2017, 5:36 pm

Chapter 3: A New Identity And New Borders
So for the last day or so, I have continued to work with the new Carolina, especially the borders, which seems to be such a contenious debate sometimes. My main goal is to reduce the amount of land that is taken by the new proposal to only what is necessary, ie. the area which would likely be inspired to leave the United States by strong Southern Nationalism in the Antebellum South. The first thought that came to my mind, is that at least previously, I had been using slavery and plantation based economies to build the borders of the nation, thus making it more of a limited Confederacy than a new Southern Nation. Albeit the southern nation's economy would be based on the plantation economy, and so by looking at the plantation economy you also see who the most likely Southern Nationals are. But this doesn't do everything, in fact its far from everything.

For the new borders I decided to look into something many people know, a region called Dixie. Dixie is the most popular name for the south that has retained southern principles and ideology throughout the years. This region primarily consists of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, and Louisiana. Kentucky, Florida, Virginia, and Texas are also often considered to be a part of the Dixie Region according to Wikipedia. Image The second principle I used was something called the Bible Belt. The Bible Belt is a term, coined in 1924, that consists of most of the south, where Church attendance and religiousness is at a high in the United States. Southern beliefs and culture are deep rooted into the bible, and therefore this bible belt would help me to identify where the southern culture is located. This helped me to eliminate two areas from Dixie, Northern Virginia, and Western/Southern Texas. While Missouri and West Virginia are a part of the bible belt, they are not a part of Dixie, so I eliminated them. The map below shows the bible belt with the Dixie states outlined, showing the areas that were eliminated. Image Leaving us with Kentucky, Arkansas, Louisiana, East Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Southern Virginia. The next measure I used relates to slavery, because in the Antebellum South, slavery and the plantation economy was the economic way of life. So for my third measure I looked at something called the black belt. Because of increased levels of slavery, more Africans were brought into these areas of the South. As a result, many southern plantation based counties have high percentages of blacks. We can see by the picture below that the belt really begins in Delaware, and continues east of the Appalachian Mountains, south into the deep south and along the Mississippi River, into Southeastern Arkansas, Louisiana, and Eastern Texas. So Kentucky, the the Tennessee River valley are likely not the best areas for us to create the country. The map below shows the black belt with the areas deemed fit for the new country before outlined in green. The other maps shows the percentage of slaves per county in 1860 Image
Image
The next region that I decided to look at is called the Cotton Belt. This is also related to the economy, as that seemed to be a very uniting theme in the Antebellum South, but this one is on a bit less of a sad note. The cotton belt is an area where cotton was the dominate cash crop grown from the 1700's up into the 20th century. It looks at where cotton was most grown, and where cotton came to dominate the economy. As a result of cotton, the south did branch off from the rest of the country, becoming much more conservative and albeit much more slave based. The below map shows the cotton belt with the areas previously seen as fit by the other tests being outlined in green. This test did not eliminate any areas, but confirmed that the Tennessee River valley is integrally part of the southern culture. Image So with those four tests, I was able to get a good idea of where a southern country would be and where southern nationalism may run high. That being said, it could be high in other places as well, such as in Missouri or Kentucky, but you likely would not see the levels needed to leave the United States at the beginning of the civil war. So due to this, I decided that the James River is the proper northern boundary of new Carolina, as it would form a natural border between northern and southern Virginia. At the same time, only Southeastern Arkansas would be needed, as they are the only areas of Arkansas that reflect the rest of the country. On a side note, in the years leading up to the civil war, Northwestern Arkansas resented the southern plantation owners of the southeastern area. Texas is something that I would like to see some feedback on. Is Texas, east of either the Trinity River or the Brazos River Southern enough to become part of "Carolina". One thought that I had, was that Texas, really has it's own culture and identity. Therefore would they have Southern Nationalism, and would it be strong enough to join the rest of the country?

That is my main idea for the borders, since all in all, these are the areas that best matched up with the southern identity. Image Let me know your thoughts below!
User avatar
ulisse
Director of Infrastructure
Director of Infrastructure
Posts: 822
Joined: April 23rd 2015, 5:26 pm
Nation: Siculia
Location: Italy
Contact:

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by ulisse » August 15th 2017, 12:07 am

As a map it looks like it's okay. Waiting to see the story
Member State Since 10th December 2015 Director of Public Services From March 1, 2017 to February 28, 2018 - Director of Culture Since March 1, 2018 - Director of Infrastructure Since 1, 2018
User avatar
Ramon
Vice President of the Alliance
Vice President of the Alliance
Posts: 378
Joined: August 15th 2015, 10:51 pm
Nation: Santa Catarina
Location: São José, Brazil

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by Ramon » August 15th 2017, 12:23 am

I like a lot this map, so better.
Vice-President of the Alliance since March 1st, 2018
Speaker of the Alliance from March 1st, 2017 to March 1st, 2018
Need help? Send me a message!
Visit the Commonwealth of Santa Catarina!
Wiki · Forum · Ministry of International Relations
kendallhart808
Speaker of the Alliance
Speaker of the Alliance
Posts: 962
Joined: August 15th 2015, 1:22 pm
Nation: Carolina & The Cape
Location: NC

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by kendallhart808 » August 16th 2017, 4:01 am

Chapter 4: Fostering Southern Nationalism (Prelude to the Civil War)
So I initially planned for this chapter to be a long one, something that looked into southern events in detail and saw how each and every little thing could be changed so that the civil war wasn't just fought over slavery but over a sort of southern nationalism. In my honest opinion, I would love to say that the south would realistically split from the north over other things than slavery, but the thing is, that slavery was such a pressing issue in the south at the time, that it's extremely hard to ignore it. Slavery is actually what started to build southern nationalism, as the north tried to restrict it, the south tied their culture and economy to the system and saw an oppressive north trying to take it away from them.

So instead of trying to change the underlying cause going into the civil war, it might be best to add another cause, which would be southern nationalism. This doesn't involve that much of a change regarding the events that lead up to the war, in fact, these events would continue to stay how they were. But instead, we would rework how the south reacted to each event and how these events fostered southern nationalism. The other thing is to make the civil war more and more like the American Revolution, that way it becomes controlled and a true war for secession.

The first big event would be the nullification crisis. The nullification crisis, is when Congress passed a tarriff in 1828 would basically taxed exports from Britain. This helped northern industries, but southern states were forced to pay higher prices. As such, South Carolina's legislature decided that if congress did not repeal the tariff, it would nullify it. When congress passed another tariff in 1832, South Carolina made good on their word and nullified the law, prompting a standoff between South Carolina and President Jackson. Jackson ended up getting Congress to pass the Force Act which allowed him to use the army and navy to collect taxes from South Carolina, and South Carolina eventually stood down. But this is a key moment, where southerners could see that the United States is becoming an oppressive regime. It's no secret that people thought President Jackson was using quite a lot of executive power, so much that his nickname became King Andrew. The south, especially in South Carolina where this nationalism could starts to see the United States in a not-so-great light. They see their interests being discarded instead of the interests of the north. South Carolinian's are now going to begin to resent the US government, and it's the beginning of Southern Nationalism.

Let's go ahead and fast forward quite a bit, up into the 1840's. Very few major events would happen in the later 1830's, in fact southerners are going to be less open to nationalism as the government has just moved the Indians from their lands to Oklahoma so that white settlers can move out west. Texas and it's ascension into the US is also not likely to cause any fuss. But wait a moment, now things will start to go down hill fast. After the Mexican War, America needs to choose what to do with the land gained from Mexico. The free soilers come up with the idea that all the land carved out from Mexico would become free states, and could not become slave states. This is going to be something that the southern states are going to unite against, likely their first big uniting effort against the north. They are going to claim, as they did in real life that it is their right to span the continent just as it is the right of northerners to expand the continent. As we begin to approach 1850 this is going to be a particular problem and the California gold rush is going to make it even more of a problem. When California asked for entry into the United States, it was on both sides of the Missouri Compromise. Southerners are going to want for Southern California to be it's own state, while northerners of course love the idea of all of California becoming a state. Now it's hard to really see what the reaction of the south would be to the Compromise of 1850 in this exaggerated timeline, but we know that they would likely protest the idea of not being able to span from sea to shining sea. Thus in the new timeline, an influential senator from Georgia, Mark Sutten declares that the Manifest Destiny for the south is dead, and that the United States has killed it. Remember that name, it will come back. While the southern government does ratify the Compromise of 1850, the southern populace already believes that Northerners should return southern runaway slaves (the main thing the south got in the compromise was a harsh new runaway slave law). They also believe that popular sovereignty is a northern ideal to try and block southern expansion. It's no secret that you can just take all of your slaves and your farms and move right then, it takes time. And southerners believe northerners are planning to move into these territories before them, and block them off. That would mean that not only could southerners move to the new states, but the south would then on out have a set number of senators while the north would continue to carve out states. Southerners believed that this was the end, and the north was set out to squash their representation in congress. The south will then convene the Nashville Convention to discuss what they will do if the north further encroaches upon their right to slavery or denies them political representation. This is kinda ended with the acts of the Compromise passed, but the Nashville Declaration declares that south has certain rights, such as representation, and freedom to span the continent.

The next big event will be the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and I'm unsure of how Southerners would respond to this in this timeline. I would actually say that it would be similar to in real life, no big fuss about it...unless you're in Kansas. But in 1857, things get slightly more heated after congress rejects the pro-slavery Lecompton Constitution for Kansas, which in the eyes of southerners was a fair constitution done with fair elections (it wasn't). But as we approach 1860, several things begin to happen. First, the ascension of Oregon into the union, begins to disrupt the the free state and slave state balance, and we will see a panic in the south as they are no longer equal in terms of senators (the only thing giving them an equal footing). Also in 1859, something else will happen, and that will be the John Brown raid on Harpers Ferry. Essentially it went down like this, a man named John Brown broke into the Federal arsenal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia and raided it, hoping to give the guns to slaves and start a massive slave uprising. The revolt failed because of many reasons. So the response to this is mainly going to be of shock. Slavery, albeit a major thing in the south was not all that was at stake. Brown's comments which will widely circle the south, made it clear he wanted to see the plantations and the people of the south go up in smoke. To many this will confirm that the north is out to get them, and they will begin questioning a southern republic. Why? Well, they no longer have proper representation in the senate as they have for the last, who knows how many years. They are seemingly being trapped in by northerners who do not want them or their practice of slavery to move west, and now northerners are threatening their life.

On the eve of 1860, slavery isn't the only thing that is on the mind of many plantation owners. They want to see a resurgent south, where they can recover from what is being seen as constant humiliation by the north, as they have now lost Kansas, been blocked from California, no longer have equal senators, and abolitionism is growing. They see Abraham Lincoln as sort of the epitome of this, and don't see Stephen Douglas as a big advocate for the south. They need someone who will champion a truly resurgent southern campaign, and there is no one other than Mark Sutten to do such a thing. Sutten essentially replaces Breckenridge from RL and becomes the Southern Democrat in the election. Being split the Democrats lose to the Republicans and a new call by Sutten is placed, its time for a Southern Union.

Want to learn more? Watch these videos for an overview of the events that I'm talking about:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beN4qE- ... 3eG7ObzO7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tkdF8pO ... 3eG7ObzO7s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=roNmeOO ... s&index=18
kendallhart808
Speaker of the Alliance
Speaker of the Alliance
Posts: 962
Joined: August 15th 2015, 1:22 pm
Nation: Carolina & The Cape
Location: NC

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by kendallhart808 » August 18th 2017, 4:18 am

Due to the events which have unfolded in Charlottesville, I have decided that this is not the direction that I want to go with Carolina. A country which left the US and fought their brothers over such a horrible institution as slavery is not the country that I want to have. I am open to any other suggestions that people may have but for now, I am cancelling Project Palmetto.
User avatar
InvaderNat
Posts: 1929
Joined: December 12th 2012, 4:59 am
Nation: Neu Westfalen
Location: New Zealand

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by InvaderNat » August 18th 2017, 7:32 am

You should really just make it not in the US. It would be a lot easier.
User avatar
JellyStar285
Posts: 130
Joined: August 6th 2016, 3:02 pm
Nation: Deimenovinas
Location: The Slums of San Favero
Contact:

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by JellyStar285 » August 18th 2017, 3:05 pm

That escalated quickly... :O
"Some days I wonder whether life is worth living, then I remember what’s out there in the world. It brings me comfort.”
User avatar
rhkobayashi
Posts: 247
Joined: January 17th 2014, 1:24 am
Nation: Wilfran and Rapha
Location: Brazil

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by rhkobayashi » August 18th 2017, 4:22 pm

InvaderNat wrote:You should really just make it not in the US. It would be a lot easier.
I agree too!
User avatar
Gregor
Posts: 1437
Joined: December 25th 2011, 2:30 pm
Nation: Oka & Malerno
Location: Lausanne
Contact:

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by Gregor » August 18th 2017, 4:40 pm

I like how you write your history, I've learnt a lot personally about North/South relations, and how tricky they are. I share also your disdain for the events in Charlottesville, and feel sorry that emotions and politics interplay in this matter in what for all of us is leisure time..

However, a geographic position should not discriminate you, building on this territory doesn't mean you abide to their policies, neither does Jmsepe taking part of Kyushu and Japan's history doesn't mean he agrees with what Japan has done (which is just as bad).

We must come to terms with what happened and take responsibility, America should accept what happened, and remember history. Obviously these symbols are offensive, but neither do I think that "forgetting" what happened is a solution. America has always been about many communities building this country as a sort of common project, and should stay like that, without forgetting it's past.

If we forget history it is bound to repeat itself. And I like very much your work in the sense you propose an alternative, a possibility that never happened, but could have, with it's own outcome. Your work is engaged, and very positive for this reason. I give full support for Carolina as this vision of an alternative south that has matured, accepted it's history, and grown.

For now history knows that Germany, has accepted the horror it committed, and has grown for the better. Japan hasn't, and most of it's population is in denial still causing offense to many.

The decision is obviously yours, and I look forward to see the rest of your projects :)
_____________ Image Oka City AIN Cultural Capital 2018
kendallhart808
Speaker of the Alliance
Speaker of the Alliance
Posts: 962
Joined: August 15th 2015, 1:22 pm
Nation: Carolina & The Cape
Location: NC

Re: Project Palmetto - The Birth of a Southern Nation

Post by kendallhart808 » August 20th 2017, 11:01 pm

So I do believe in what Greg said, so I think that I will continue the story. All in all, its more what happens after the war than before it that will define Carolina as it is today. Just because 150 years ago Carolina fought for slavery it doesn't make the country alt-right today. Brazil had slavery until 1888 and according to Ramon has a kind of socialist government. That doesn't mean that for a time it will be bad, but the events coming into the 20th century will shape Carolina, just as they shaped the real life South. With that being said, I've decided that there is no real reason to pass a bill for more land.

So basically this is my new theory, I found a fringe piece of civil war history that I would like to expand on. It would actually change the least amount of civil war history possible. So basically here's the deal. Nothing up to 1863 in US history changes. Yep, that means the CSA in the midst of a war when the timeline picks up and tbh is losing. Yep, they are fighting for slavery and the preservation of the system that maintains their economy. So here we go...

In the summer of 1862, Governor Joseph E. Brown, believing that President Davis of the Confederacy was becoming a tyrant, issued a statement. It ordered that Davis needed to change his ways of conducting affairs or Georgia would secede from the CSA. This was a real threat to the Confederacy, but Davis saw that his policy such as the draft were necessary and paid this no mind. In August of 1862, Governor Brown opened a Secession Commission which argued that Georgia would be better off if it became a pro-union republic. The commission believed that they could secure independence by being allies with the Union against the Confederacy. Therefore on September 1, Georgia declared secession from the CSA. This sparked worry across the CSA. On September 2, Brown declared that he was now allied with the United States, but advocated that for now he was doing this as a separate nation. As word spread, several Georgian armies mutinied and declared that they now fought for Georgia, and turned against the Confederates and went to Union lines flying the Georgian flag. This prompted problems across the Confederacy though. On September 17, North Carolina declared secession and allied with the union. Florida, and Tennessee did the same in October. This prompted peril across the Confederacy, and Davis now was in charge of a split country. In 1863, the states sent delegates to a convention in Charleston, South Carolina, which was protected by the Union. States such as Tennessee and North Carolina worried that the Confederacy would pick them off, trying to conquer them in order to unite the country again. Lincoln allowed this convention to occur believing that if the states united, it would be the end of the Confederacy. The new convention created the United Southern States of America, a new constitution, based on the US Constitution but less centralized was created. The convention declared that the USSA or Carolina (as it was named because of the convention location) was firmly on the side of the union, but was allies with the United States, and did not seek entry into the Union. Brown was elected the first President in March of 1862, and commanded the troops of Carolina, many of which had mutinied from the Confederacy to attack Alabama and Mississippi. The Union relieved the naval blockade of Carolina, which allowed for them to trade and get money to support the army. As troops neared Bayonne la Vella (Montgomery, I like the name so much I'm sticking with it) they met Union General Sherman which helped attack the Alabama River valley with a Union army. Now overwhelmed, Davis contemplated surrender, but commanded a northern expedition into Maryland to hopefully pacify the US so he could go after Carolina (IRL Battles of Antietam and Gettysburg stuff). Carolina knew this was Davis' plan, and Lincoln knew that Carolina was the US's most important asset in the Civil War at this point. Lincoln also feared that if he turned against Carolina, which was technically allied with him, public opinion and international opinion would sway against the war. Britain even went as far as to advise Lincoln not to do it, warning that Britain would intervene "if the United States turned against it's allies". Therefore he called President Brown to Washington DC to meet with him in a closed door setting. The meeting basically entailed this. If Carolina would continue to fight against the Confederacy on the Southern and Mississippi fronts while the US fought them in Maryland, Lincoln would give Carolina autonomy (aka. proposing a protectorate) and on top of that, Mississippi and Alabama would be given to Carolina as territories. The catch was that slavery would have to be ended by 1880. Brown agreed on the deal, although thought Lincoln was proposing independence.

So I won't go into much of the battles and stuff because that's where it would get funky but really by about 1864 the entire deep south is liberated by the coalition armies. Carolina now isn't really fighting for slavery, more for the creation of it's nation and against "the tyranny of Davis. But as a side note, when the emancipation proclamation doesn't apply to Carolina as in the American's eyes it's now the Carolinian Protectorate, slaves are a bit sad. The civil war ends the same, Lee will surrender at Appomattox Court House to a union army. Alabama and Mississippi will be given to Carolina as territories.

So like what's the next 150 years like. Well, it's hard to see how Lincoln would set up the protectorate but likely with a lot of autonomy going to Carolina. Lincoln and Brown will meet again this time in Augusta, Georgia (the current capital) to discuss the protectorate and reconstitution. Lincoln is likely to flatly reject Carolinian independence but Lincoln makes a deal. If Carolina enacts gradual compensated emancipation, paid for by both the U.S. and Carolina during the protectorate era, as soon as slavery is illegal, the protectorate will be rescinded and Carolina will be given independence. Brown is like super not happy about this because he was very pro-slavery but seeing that there is no other choice he accepts. He will be replaced by Alexander Homann at the Democratic Party nomination in 1868 for this, and Homann like any Democrat in Carolina at the time wins the presidency by a landslide. Brown also failed to really be able to stand up to Radical Republicans in Congress after Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, although the Radicals were unable to force emancipation upon Carolina. Homann was the more moderate but also outspoken version of Brown. He advocated that Carolina's system of reconstruction was working fine and was not quiet when Radicals tried to walk on Carolina. Carolina essentially was in charge of it's own affairs. While the U.S. Congress could legislate for Carolina, they could not legislate over the issue of slavery, although they tried by trying to force Carolina to become part of the US. Homann brought Congress to the Supreme Court several times which ruled in favor of Carolina each time. But during the 1870's, this fostered sentiment against the protectorate. Something that was at one time haroled as making peace to the civil war and allowing concessions to both sides, was now becoming something that Carolinian's resented. And it wasn't the slavery part. In fact the United States and Britain invested money into the infrastructure and industrialization of Carolina, as Britain believed that Carolina could leave slavery by becoming more industrial. Reconstruction generally fared well in Carolina unlike in the United States, which was riddled by violence. But the KKK began to rise, and some slave owners refused to let go of their slaves. States would then have to round up the National Guard and free the slaves, many of which would then leave for the United States where they had political rights. In 1884, Carolina was announced slave free, as the last slave was ceremonially freed in Alabama. President Arthur of the United States, then called a Constitutional Convention in Savannah, Georgia where a new Constitution was ratified that was agreed upon by both the United States and Carolina. Arthur approved the Constitution, which created the new Federal Republic of Carolina. It intentionally left the black rights question vague, as Arthur knew that it could be an issue to spark controversy. Essentially states could not deny voting based on color, but like in the rest of the south, this left segregation and voting disenfranchisement up to the states. Carolina was ceremonially given independence on June 11, 1884.

And if you did not want to read all of that, here's a neat diagram I'm testing out to get the jist of the story without spending all that time reading :)
Image
Post Reply

Return to “United Carolinian Confederation”